Research

My research is based on an experimental practice of aural architecture, intersecting the fields of sonic art, architecture, soundscape studies, acoustics, psychoacoustics, acoustic ecology and metaphysics.

An exploration of sonic space as vibration 


My approach lies in extending a spatial practice based in the experience of sound waves propagation and the phenomena of resonance and attunement. The emphasis is on a practical engagement with the ecology of vibration. It aims to foster an understanding of our environment (space, things, and living beings) as a field of molecules in constant vibration, of vibrant matter (Bennett 2011), as an unifying field of relationships. My practice questions how certain sounds and frequencies diffused in specific acoustic spaces may engage a vibrational experience of attunement, as a living dynamic relation with another being (Morton 2014). The projects explore the creative potential of frequencies in the design of different scales of spaces for the experience of vibration. The phenomena of vibration is approached from the micro-scale of sound waves’ molecular movements in sound compositions, to the macro-scale of frequencies’ geometric patterns in the design of acoustic spaces. The research methodology explores transdisciplinary ideas and tests the artworks in public events. The theoretical framework that sustains the practical explorations enquires on ideas such as: resonance of space and body as acoustic instruments; affective attunement; materiality of vibration; geometry and frequencies’ patterns; bioacoustics.


Building together 


Another aspect of my approach, is the engagement on social and cultural micropolitics in a local scale, aligned with global ecological and educational movements. Through workshops and events, I look to contribute to self-building practices, collective creativity, ecological awareness and sustainability. Projects emerge from dynamics of building together, involving and encouraging people to appropriate space and time in everyday life, and extending alternative forms of co-creating  our surroundings.